BAJKY JEAN DE LA FONTAINE PDF

Both sides of his family were of the highest provincial middle class; though they were not noble, his father was fairly wealthy. She seems to have been both beautiful and intelligent, but the two did not get along well together. There appears to be absolutely no ground for the vague scandal as to her conduct, which was, for the most part, raised long afterwards by gossip or personal enemies of La Fontaine. All that can be positively said against her is that she was a negligent housewife and an inveterate novel reader; La Fontaine himself was constantly away from home, was certainly not strict in point of conjugal fidelity, and was so bad a man of business that his affairs became involved in hopeless difficulty, and a financial separation of property separation de biens had to take place in One son was born to them in , and was educated and taken care of wholly by his mother.

Author:Tajar Gulrajas
Country:Yemen
Language:English (Spanish)
Genre:Personal Growth
Published (Last):2 May 2015
Pages:10
PDF File Size:14.54 Mb
ePub File Size:6.16 Mb
ISBN:308-9-54663-517-9
Downloads:86896
Price:Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader:Zulkizilkree



Jean de La Fontaine, born July 8? Life La Fontaine was born in the Champagne region into a bourgeois family. From to he held office as an inspector of forests and waterways, an office inherited from his father. It was in Paris , however, that he made his most important contacts and spent his most productive years as a writer.

An outstanding feature of his existence was his ability to attract the goodwill of patrons prepared to relieve him of the responsibility of providing for his livelihood. In he was elected to the French Academy after some opposition by the king to his unconventional and irreligious character.

The Fables in the second collection show even greater technical skill than those in the first and are longer, more reflective, and more personal.

Some decline of talent is commonly detected in the twelfth book. La Fontaine did not invent the basic material of his Fables; he took it chiefly from the Aesopic tradition and, in the case of the second collection, from the East Asian. He enriched immeasurably the simple stories that earlier fabulists had in general been content to tell perfunctorily, subordinating them to their narrowly didactic intention. He contrived delightful miniature comedies and dramas, excelling in the rapid characterization of his actors, sometimes by deft sketches of their appearance or indications of their gestures and always by the expressive discourse he invented for them.

In settings usually rustic, he evoked the perennial charm of the countryside. Within the compass of about poems, the range and the diversity of subject and of treatment are astonishing. Often he held up a mirror to the social hierarchy of his day.

The Fables occasionally reflect contemporary political issues and intellectual preoccupations. Some of them, fables only in name, are really elegies, idylls, epistles, or poetic meditations.

But his chief and most comprehensive theme remains that of the traditional fable: the fundamental, everyday moral experience of mankind throughout the ages, exhibited in a profusion of typical characters, emotions, attitudes, and situations.

Get exclusive access to content from our First Edition with your subscription. Simple countryfolk and heroes of Greek mythology and legend , as well as familiar animals of the fable , all play their parts in this comedy, and the poetic resonance of the Fables owes much to these actors who, belonging to no century and to every century, speak with timeless voices.

What disconcerts many non-French readers and critics is that in the Fables profundity is expressed lightly. They are serious representations of human types, so presented as to hint that human nature and animal nature have much in common. But they are also creatures of fantasy, bearing only a distant resemblance to the animals the naturalist observes, and they are amusing because the poet skillfully exploits the incongruities between the animal and the human elements they embody.

Moreover—as in his Contes, but with far more delicate and lyrical modulations—the voice of La Fontaine himself can constantly be heard, always controlled and discreet, even when most charged with emotion. Its tones change swiftly, almost imperceptibly: they are in turn ironical , impertinent, brusque , laconic , eloquent , compassionate, melancholy , or reflective. To the grace, ease, and delicate perfection of the best of the Fables, even close textual commentary cannot hope to do full justice.

They represent the quintessence of a century of experiments in prosody and poetic diction in France. The great majority of the Fables are composed of lines of varying metre and, from the unpredictable interplay of their rhymes and of their changing rhythms, La Fontaine derived the most exquisite and diverse effects of tone and movement.

His vocabulary harmonizes widely different elements: the archaic , the precious and the burlesque, the refined, the familiar and the rustic, the language of professions and trades and the language of philosophy and mythology. But for all this richness, economy and understatement are the chief characteristics of his style, and its full appreciation calls for keener sensitivity to the overtones of 17th-century French than most foreign readers can hope to possess.

Jean de La Fontaine.

ASDF LKJ TYPING PDF

Kniha: Bajky – Junior – La Fontaine Jean de

.

DURUFLE MOTETS PDF

Bajky – Jean de La Fontaine

.

Related Articles