ASPERGILLUS TAMARII PDF

Abstract Primary cutaneous aspergillosis is a rare disease usually caused by Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus terreus and Aspergillus ustus. It is usually seen in immunocompromised hosts, though some cases are also reported in immunocompetent hosts. We present a case of an immunocompetent farmer who presented with generalised nodules and plaques, mimicking erythema nodosum leprosum but turned out to be cutaneous aspergillosis caused by Aspergillus tamarii. The characteristic ascospores of Aspergillus species were found in skin lesions on fungus isolated in culture. The patient showed excellent response to antifungal therapy.

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Abstract Primary cutaneous aspergillosis is a rare disease usually caused by Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus terreus and Aspergillus ustus. It is usually seen in immunocompromised hosts, though some cases are also reported in immunocompetent hosts. We present a case of an immunocompetent farmer who presented with generalised nodules and plaques, mimicking erythema nodosum leprosum but turned out to be cutaneous aspergillosis caused by Aspergillus tamarii.

The characteristic ascospores of Aspergillus species were found in skin lesions on fungus isolated in culture. The patient showed excellent response to antifungal therapy. Background Aspergillosis is usually seen in patients suffering from tuberculosis, malignancies, silicosis, diabetes or those on long-term corticosteroids, immunosuppression and antibiotics.

Secondary cutaneous lesions result either from contiguous extension to the skin from an infected underlying structure or from widespread blood borne seeding of the skin. He had a history of trauma to the right foot 1 month ago. The posterior pharyngeal wall was congested with white exudates that did not bleed on touch. A partially healed traumatic wound was present on the right foot. There was no thickened nerve, hypopigmented or hypoanaesthetic patch.

Systemic examination was unremarkable. A provisional clinical diagnosis of viral enteritis with secondary streptococcal pharyngitis with erythema nodosum was kept and treated with supportive therapy and antibiotics. Dermatologist gave the clinical diagnosis of erythema nodosum leprosum for the skin lesion.

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